Macarthur students set to find out 'what'll happen to the wattle'

Elderslie Public School students are looking forward to finding out what happens to the 'space wattle'. Picture: Supplied
Elderslie Public School students are looking forward to finding out what happens to the 'space wattle'. Picture: Supplied

What happens to wattle seeds that have spent some time in outer space?

Bargo and Elderslie Public School students have been selected to find out.

The two schools will take part in the Australian Space Agency seed planting program which is held in collaboration with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

The wattle seeds will live in space on the International Space Station for six months, returning to Australia in time for Science Week 2021.

Elderslie Public School's deputy principal Kate Caruana said students will germinate and grow the seeds to record data about their growth.

"The trees will become part of a map identifying 'Wattle Space Trees' in Australia," she said.

"A few years ago, our school was part of a historical project where students where part of a group to be the first primary school students to send a coded experiment to the International Space Station.

"When we saw the opportunity to take part in another space project we were compelled to apply and honoured to be accepted."

The team of Bargo Public School students who helped with the school's entry into the 'space wattle' program. Picture: Supplied

The team of Bargo Public School students who helped with the school's entry into the 'space wattle' program. Picture: Supplied

Bargo Public School's assistant principal Cassandra Menne said they were also proud to have been selected.

"We are very proud of our work, which involved students in year 3 and 4 brainstorming ideas to write, filming and editing video footage to create a quality written and video submission," she said.

"The golden wattle will be right at home here in our lovely school with a view of the night sky, away from the light pollution of the city."

The chosen schools around Australia will receive wattle seeds that have flown to space, plus seeds that have not from the same seed lot.

Students will then track the seed growth and upload data to the 'What'll happen to the wattle??!' app.

The 12-month to 2 year project will result in the creation of a nationwide map identifying the location of Australia's 'space wattle' trees.

"Students were very excited that their application had been successful - they worked hard on the application and were pleased their hard work paid off," Ms Caruana said.

"This is an opportunity for our students to engage in real-world, purposeful learning that can help inform the future.

"It allows our students to understand that they can have an impact on the future and to grow them even further into responsible global citizens of tomorrow."

This story Macarthur students set to find out 'what'll happen to the wattle' first appeared on Camden-Narellan Advertiser.