Return and earn to help farmers and bushfire victims

Picture: John Veage
Picture: John Veage

There is no doubt that the state government's Return and Earn scheme has been popular with Macarthur locals - and now you can use your returns to help farmers.

Local recyclers can donate to Bottles for the Bush on all reverse vending machines, with 10 cents from each container going towards helping farmers and rural families impacted by the drought and the recent bushfires.

Bottles for the Bush will run until February 23 across NSW.

This option is part of a nationwide appeal that has raised more than $430,000 so far, with more than $360,000 coming through NSW's Return and Earn scheme.

Return and Earn has now soared past 3 billion containers returned state wide just a month after the second anniversary of the initiative.

Wollondilly MP Nathaniel Smith said the people of Macarthur should be commended for their ongoing commitment to reducing litter.

He encouraged residents to consider donating to the Bottles for the Bush next time they made a return.

"The growth of the scheme has been phenomenal and highlights a fundamental change in people's thinking and behaviour around litter," Mr Smith said.

"Return and Earn has been very successful in Wollondilly with more than 24.2 million containers returned helping to contribute to the 3 billion now collected."

Camden MP Peter Sidgreaves said summer was peak season for return and earners cashing in their containers to help the environment

He said the recent holiday period was particularly impressive for returned containers.

"Statewide between December 21, 2019 and January 13, 2020, there were 10 days with more than 7 million drink containers returned a day, including four days with over 8 million containers returned." Mr Sidgreaves said.

"The scheme has highlighted so many positives across communities and every bottle returned is a win for the environment."

For more information, visit: returnandearn.org.au.

This story Return and earn to help farmers and bushfire victims first appeared on Wollondilly Advertiser.