Bar Centrale customers knit more than 100 blankets for less fortunate

Hard at work: Tanya Whitehouse, Skye Betts, Sonya Mouland and Kaye Allen with some of the blankets. Picture: Simon Bennett
Hard at work: Tanya Whitehouse, Skye Betts, Sonya Mouland and Kaye Allen with some of the blankets. Picture: Simon Bennett

Families escaping domestic violence will have one less thing to worry about this winter thanks to the generosity of Macarthur locals.

Customers at Campbelltown's Bar Centrale cafe have spent the past several weeks hard at work turning trolleys full of crocheted white wool into lovely blankets to help the most vulnerable in our community.

Staff and customers at Bar Centrale helped to crochet more than 300 metres of wool last year as part of the NSW Police Force's push to create the world's largest white ribbon and raise awareness of Australia's frightening domestic violence statistics.

After making the trip down to Taree, those 300 metres of crocheted wool returned to the Queen Street eatery where owner Sonya Moulang encouraged regulars to repurpose them into full-size blankets, cot-sized blankets and scarves.

Each of the more than 130 blankets was brightened up with colourful borders and included some cute animal appliques.

Ms Moulang said she was overwhelmed by the level of support.

"We've had so many people helping out," she said.

"Whether it was just a row or 10 blankets, every little bit helped and we're so grateful.

"One person alone knitted 63 blankets - Grandma B."

Blankets were delivered to WILMA Women's Health earlier this week. Picture: Bar Centrale

Blankets were delivered to WILMA Women's Health earlier this week. Picture: Bar Centrale

Ms Moulang said the blankets and scarves were on their way to several local community groups, including We Are Community, WILMA Women's Health and the Macarthur Women's Domestic Violence Court Advocacy Service.

Tanya Whitehouse from the domestic violence service said the blanket donation meant a lot to the recipients.

"We were very grateful to be given the opportunity to receive these blankets," she said.

"We've got 30 blankets and they will make a big difference to women and families in vulnerable situations.

"They often have to leave home very quickly without many supplies so the blankets can make a big difference."

Ms Whitehouse said the fact that so many members of the public actively helped the most vulnerable in the community was very heartening.

"It goes to show that domestic violence is much less of a taboo subject than it used to be," she said.

"It's great to see the community engaged in supporting vulnerable people."