Anzac Day: A legend born from battle

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ANSWERING THE CALL TO SERVE: The initial "Anzacs"  were volunteers from the First Australian Imperial Force. The campaign lasted eight-and-a-half months.

ANSWERING THE CALL TO SERVE: The initial "Anzacs" were volunteers from the First Australian Imperial Force. The campaign lasted eight-and-a-half months.

Anzac Day salutes the courage and valour of those soldiers who fought at Gallipoli.

They may have suffered defeat, however, their courage spawned a legend which is observed to this day.

Those initial "Anzacs" were volunteers from the First Australian Imperial Force.

They were called to serve alongside British and French troops in a bid to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula, then under German and Ottoman control.

About 20,000 diggers disembarked on the thin strip of beach known as Gaba Tepe at dawn, April 25, 1915.

By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs.

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Their commanding officers had under-estimated the determination of the enemy Turks, under the command of Mustafa Kemal Atatrk. But the Australians and New Zealanders fought on.

These "worthy sons of the Empire" fought a piecemeal battle under mixed orders.

These days, Anzac Day provides the nation time to pause and reflect on that horrific death toll from 1915.