Developer’s second crack at controversial proposal

Livid: Residents in Colonial Street and surrounding streets vent their displeasure with the proposed 19-room boarding house in 2015. Picture: Sam Venn.

Livid: Residents in Colonial Street and surrounding streets vent their displeasure with the proposed 19-room boarding house in 2015. Picture: Sam Venn.

Nearby residents and Campbelltown councillors categorically said ‘no’.

But that hasn’t stopped the applicant behind a controversial boarding house in Colonial Street, Campbelltown.

An application for a 19-room boarding house was first lodged two years ago and was met with strong opposition by those resided near the block of land.

Councillors rejected the application due to concerns over the design, number of potential residents, streetscape and visual privacy.

So off to the Land and Environment Court it went.

While no decision has officially been made by the court, the applicant exercised their right to resubmit amended plans in a bid to satisfy the council’s concerns.

Amendments include: reducing the number of rooms from 19 to 18; removing balconies from three upper level rooms; adding two car parks, two bike spaces and two motorbike spaces to the lower level and removing two spaces in the front yard; and creating one single driveway instead of two.

The community has until Tuesday, June 27 to provide feedback on the latest plans after they were placed on public exhibition on Tuesday, June 13.

Colonial Street resident Victoria Waldron-Hahn led the protests against the application two years ago.

Her stance had not changed.

She said the amount density of the development and the lack of parking were the biggest concerns.

“It’s not the type of people (who will live there) but the type of development we object to,” she said.

“If there are five cars parked on the street now it’s practically full.”

When it comes to boarding houses, council's hands are tied.

Under the State Environmental Planning Policy (Affordable Rental Housing) Act 2009, the dwellings are able to be constructed even if they are contradictory to the council’s own planning controls.

Campbelltown Council previously asked the state government to put a halt on boarding houses in the area.

However, those requests were ignored.

Ms Waldron-Hahn said it was “devastating” the proposal had been placed on public exhibition.

“It’s just like starting from scratch again. It’s like the process is aimed at wearing us down,” she said.

“It appears that it (the SEPP) is weighted towards developers.

“It’s disenchanting.”

The application can be viewed at Campbelltown Council’s administration building and the HJ Daley Library in Campbelltown.

For more information call 4645 4608 or visit campbelltown.nsw.gov.au.

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