Sports clubs stick solid with chocolate drives

Best of both worlds: Macquarie Fields Cricket Club Milo T20 players (left to right) Lucas Torlaschi, 10 and brother Adam, 13, enjoy a game and a chocolate with their dad and fellow club member Martin. Picture: Ben Chenoweth

Best of both worlds: Macquarie Fields Cricket Club Milo T20 players (left to right) Lucas Torlaschi, 10 and brother Adam, 13, enjoy a game and a chocolate with their dad and fellow club member Martin. Picture: Ben Chenoweth

The chocolate fund raiser in an iconic Australian past time.

It helps provide money for the little things all sports clubs need – like trophies and equipment – and satisfies the cravings of those with a sweet tooth.

While the Federation of Parents and Citizens Associations of NSW have recommended banning unhealthy fund raisers – like the drives – local sporting associations say there are no intentions to follow suit.

A recent Federation of Parents and Citizens Associations of NSW report, Inquiry into Childhood Overweight and Obesity, recommended moving away from fund raisers selling “unhealthy” foods, and instead try to build kitties through outdoor events.

It even suggested swapping chocolates for plants.

Macarthur Football Association chairman and Campbelltown councillor Darcy Lound, said he thought the idea was “going to far”.

“From my point of view, as an association I don’t think we’d be enforcing that,” he said.

“I’ve been involved in lots of chocolate drives when I was growing up and even in my senior years.”

His sentiments were echoed by the association’s general manager Glenn Armstrong.

Mr Armstrong said he believed the drives weren’t as popular as they once were, though it wasn’t up to the association to determine how clubs raised much needed funds.

“People have gone away from chocolate drives because it’s a lot of hard work for little reward,” he said.

“But I don’t think it’s our place to be banning (types) of fund raising.”

Garry Rowe, president of the Camden District Cricket Association which includes teams in all three Macarthur LGAS, said he had no intentions to enforce the “draconian” restrictions.

“Chocolate drives are intrinsic for the fund raising of clubs,” he said.

“The are a key fund raising tool.

“I don’t believe in a nanny state, it’s an individual choice.

“We as an organisation won’t stop clubs from doing that.

“To stop the chocolate drives itself is draconian.”

Jenny Bazley, secretary of the Camden and District Netball Association – which also included teams from Campbelltown, Camden and Wollondilly – said she didn’t see the association banning the fund raisers either.

“We have 11 clubs in our association so we do the drives to try and help pay for representative uniforms and equipment,” she said.

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